Evaluating the Patient and Setting-Specific Factors That Influenced the Quality of Informed Consent in a Retrospective Cohort of Subtotal Cholecystectomy Patients

Evaluating the Patient and Setting-Specific Factors That Influenced the Quality of Informed Consent in a Retrospective Cohort of Subtotal Cholecystectomy Patients
Mina Mesri, Ikemsinachi C. Nzenwa, Raimundas Lunevicius
Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques, 13 July 2020
Abstract
Introduction
Cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure in general surgery. The consent procedure for cholecystectomy needs to inform patients about the possibility of subtotal cholecystectomy (STC) as an alternative procedure used for “difficult gallbladders” as it is associated with increased postoperative morbidity. We sought to determine the quality of informed consent for patients who were scheduled for cholecystectomy but underwent STC, and evaluate whether patient or procedural factors influenced the information discussed in consenting.
Materials and Methods
We classified 57 components of information necessary for a patient to give informed consent for cholecystectomy. We retrospectively reviewed the consent forms of patients scheduled for conventional cholecystectomy but instead undergoing STC between 2011 and 2017. Consent quality was measured as the percentage of components completed. Subgroup analyses were conducted to determine whether age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, setting (elective/nonelective), operation mode (open/laparoscopic), or the responsible surgeon affected consent quality.
Results
Across 174 patients, just 9 (5.2%) had been informed about the possibility of undergoing STC, whereas the overall quality of consent was 37.5%. Patient and setting-specific factors affected the completion of specific consent components. Patients were more likely to receive a patient information leaflet if they were female (relative risk [RR] 2.76; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–7.00), <60 years (RR 3.32; 95% CI 1.39–7.90) or undergoing laparoscopic surgery (RR 8.04; 95% CI 2.50–25.88).
Conclusion
The suboptimal quality of consent and multiple inconsistencies in the information disclosed to different patient cohorts emphasize the need for a more transparent and consistent consenting process.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s