Implementing new consent procedures for schools-based human papillomavirus vaccination: a qualitative study

Implementing new consent procedures for schools-based human papillomavirus vaccination: a qualitative study
Research
Suzanne Audrey, Karen Evans, Michelle Farr, Joanne Ferrie, Julie Yates, Marion Roderick, Harriet Fisher
British Journal of Child Health, 10 April 2021; 2(2)
Abstract
Background
The requirement for written parental consent for school-based human papillomavirus vaccination programme in England can act as a barrier to uptake for some young women, with the potential to exacerbate health inequities.
Aims
To consider the practicalities and implications of implementing new consent procedures, including parental telephone consent and adolescent self-consent, in two local authority areas in the southwest of England.
Methods
Digitally recorded, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 53 participants, including immunisation nurses, school staff, young people, and parents. All interviews were fully transcribed and thematic analysis was undertaken.
Results
Parental telephone consent was welcomed by the immunisation nurses, parents, and young women in the study. Adolescent self-consent was rare. Greater understanding of the barriers to uptake outside of mainstream school-based sessions is needed to further address inequalities in uptake.
Conclusions
The new procedures generally worked well but some important barriers to vaccination uptake remain.

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