Informed consent in interventional radiology – are we doing enough?

Informed consent in interventional radiology – are we doing enough?
Akash Prashar, Saqib Butt, Davide Giuseppe Castiglione, Nadeem Shaida
British Journal of Radiology, 21 April 2021
Abstract
Objectives
Obtaining informed consent is a mandatory part of modern clinical practice. The aim of this study was to identify how often complications relating to Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures were discussed with the patient prior to the procedure.
Methods
A retrospective analysis of 100 patients who experienced a complication related to an IR procedure was performed. The patient’s procedure consent form was examined to identify whether the complication they experienced had been discussed as a possible risk. Other parts of the consent form relating to need for blood transfusion and the need for further procedures were also examined.
Results
39% of patients who experienced a complication did not have the complication documented as a potential risk on the consent form. 14% of patients required a blood transfusion but were not consented for this. 42% of patients required a further procedure or operation but were not warned of this.
Conclusion
The model of gaining informed consent on the day of procedure is no longer valid. Better education and the use of clinics, patient information sheets and other resources is essential.

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