The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the challenge to treatment without consent of individuals with psychosocial disabilities [BOOK CHAPTER]

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the challenge to treatment without consent of individuals with psychosocial disabilities [BOOK CHAPTER]
Bernadette McSherry, Lisa Waddington
Routledge, Human Rights Education for Psychologists, 2020
Abstract
This chapter explores the developing emphasis on human rights in mental health care and treatment and what it means in particular for the compulsory treatment of individuals with psychosocial disabilities. Informed consent to treatment is generally presumed to be central to the provision of good-quality health care. However, many countries have mental health laws that enable the detention and treatment without consent of individuals with “psychosocial disabilities”. Awareness of the need to support people with psychosocial disabilities to make their own decisions is an obvious starting point for promoting human rights in this area. Psychologists and professional associations may have a role in ensuring that mental health care and treatment are provided on a voluntary basis as much as possible. The chapter provides an overview of the conceptual aspects of human rights and compulsory mental health treatment and analyse what the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities may mean for the practice of human rights-based treatment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s