The Impact of the Informed Consent Process on the Anxiety Levels of Patients Undergoing Rhinoplasty

The Impact of the Informed Consent Process on the Anxiety Levels of Patients Undergoing Rhinoplasty
A Aysel, U Uz, B Karatan, E Aydin, E Erdoğan, F Yilmaz, T Müderris
The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 15 July 2021
Abstract
Septorhinoplasty is one of the most common elective surgical procedures in otolaryngology. The present study aimed to evaluate the anxiety levels of patients who underwent septorhinoplasty at different times, compare the information methods, and determine the understanding of the informed consent through recall rates of the complications explained in the informed consent process. The patients were divided into the following 2 groups: Group 1 (giving information 14 days before the surgery) and Group 2 (giving information 3 days before the surgery). For the preoperative anxiety measurement, the State anxiety scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used. All patients were asked to recall the complications they remembered from the consent form on the day before the surgery. Each group has consisted of 25 patients. No significant difference was found between the STAI-1 and STAI-2a anxiety scores between groups. In Group 1, the STAI-2b anxiety score was significantly lower than the STAI-1 and STAI-2a scores (P < 0.05). In Group 2, the mean score of STAI-2b was not significantly higher than the STAI-1 and STAI-2 scores (P > 0.05). When the STAI-2b scores of the two groups were compared, the scores of Group 2 were significantly higher (P < 0.05). The most commonly remembered complications were bruising and swelling in both of the groups. In conclusion, the authors believe that long-term cooperation between the surgical team and the patient will reduce the anxiety levels of the patients and increase patients’ satisfaction, resulting in a significant reduction in the amount of potential legal processes. Level of Evidence: 2.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s