How important are informed consent, informed choice, and patient-doctor relationships, when prescribing antipsychotic medication?

How important are informed consent, informed choice, and patient-doctor relationships, when prescribing antipsychotic medication?
Article
Journal of Mental Health, 8 March 2022
Abstract
Background
Antipsychotic medications (APs) are used for people with psychosis diagnoses and, increasingly for other problems and groups.
Aims
This study examines how APs are prescribed, from the perspective of recipients.
Methods
757 people, from 30 countries, responded to questions about their experiences with APs in an online survey.
Results
Most (70%) were told nothing about adverse effects. Fewer than 2% recall being told about the risks of diabetes, suicidality, sexual dysfunction or reduced life span. None recalled being told about reduced brain volume or withdrawal effects. Only 28% recalled being offered other treatments; with only 14% offered talking therapies. 46% were not told how long to take the APs; and, of those, 48% were told to take them forever. Most respondents (76%) were not told how APs work. Only 19% were satisfied with the prescribing process, and only 25% reported a good, or very good, relationship with the prescriber. Information, satisfaction with the process and prescriber relationship were all positively related to three self-reported outcomes: reduction of problems the drugs were prescribed for, general helpfulness, and quality of life.
Conclusions
Steps need to be taken to ensure people prescribed antipsychotics are fully informed, especially about adverse effects and alternatives.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s