What Qualitative Researchers Must Do When Ethical Assurances Disintegrate? Recognise Internal Confidentiality, Establish Process Consent, Reference Groups, Referrals for Participants and a Safety Plan [Conference Paper]

What Qualitative Researchers Must Do When Ethical Assurances Disintegrate? Recognise Internal Confidentiality, Establish Process Consent, Reference Groups, Referrals for Participants and a Safety Plan [Conference Paper]
Martin Tolich
World Conference on Qualitative Research, 17 September 2019
Abstract
Informed consent and confidentiality are the two mainstays of qualitative research ethics, yet they have a propensity to disintegrate in an emergent, iterative research design. This chapter examines how to approach this uncharted territory by having researchers take full responsibility for ethical considerations by using more robust forms of consent like process consent; recognising the dual faces of confidentiality, distinguishing external confidentiality from internal confidentiality. Other responsibilities in post ethics review environment include recognising and addressing big ethical moments. At times, participants and researchers ethical protections disintegrate too. When participants are at risk, furnish referrals (i.e. suicide watch phone numbers). When researchers are at risk work off a safety plan. Additionally, given this unpredictability, researchers should create a standing reference group to assist answering the fourth question above: what to do when the project raises ethical questions not foreseen in formal ethics review or by the researcher.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s