Abstract 391: Variation in Time to Notification After Enrollment in Trials Conducted Under Exception From Informed Consent for Emergency Research [POSTER PRESENTATION]

Abstract 391: Variation in Time to Notification After Enrollment in Trials Conducted Under Exception From Informed Consent for Emergency Research [POSTER PRESENTATION]
Graham Nichol, Rui Zhuang, Tom P Aufderheide, Eileen Bulger, Clifton W Callaway, Jim Christenson, Mohamud R Daya, Ahamed H Idris, Peter Kudenchuk, Laurie J Morrison, Martin A Schreiber, George Sopko, Jeremy Sugarman, Christian Vaillancourt, Henry E Wang, Myron Weisfeldt, Susanne May
Circulation, 11 November 2019; 140(supplement 2)
Open Access
Abstract
Context
Research in an emergency setting is challenging because the window of opportunity to treat may be short, and preclude time to obtain informed consent from the patient or their representative. Such research can be conducted under exception from informed consent (EFIC) if specific criteria are met. In the United States, this includes notification of an enrolled subject or their representative as soon as feasible after enrollment so that they have autonomy to opt out from ongoing study participation. To date, there is limited empiric information about time to notification (TTN).
Objective
To describe variation in TTN among sites participating in randomized trials conducted under exception from informed consent for emergency research.
Methods
Notification strategies were determined at each site prior to initiation of subject enrollment, and approved by a local institutional review board or equivalent. TTN was summarized overall, as well as stratified by site and clinical outcome among patients enrolled in multiple trials conducted by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC).
Results
Included were 34,868 patients enrolled in four trials. Of these, 33,805 had with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; and 1,063 had life-threatening traumatic injury. TTN varied (Table).
Conclusions
There is large variation in TTN in trials conducted under EFIC for emergency research. Early notification is difficult; delayed notification may reduce the autonomy of patients or their representative.

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